SMALL BOWELL RESECTION

Description

Small bowel resection is surgery to remove a part of your small bowel.

It is done when part of your small bowel is blocked or diseased.

The small bowel is also called the small intestine.

Most digestion (breaking down and absorbing nutrients) of the food you eat takes place in the small intestine.

Bowell resection

You will receive general anesthesia at the time of your surgery. This will keep you asleep and pain-free.
The surgery can be performed laparoscopically or with open surgery.

If you have laparoscopic surgery:

• The surgeon makes 3 to 5 small cuts (incisions) in your lower belly.

A medical device called a laparoscope is inserted through one of the cuts. The scope is a thin, lighted tube with a camera on the end. It lets the surgeon see inside your belly. Other medical instruments are inserted through the other cuts.

• A cut of about 2 to 3 inches (5 to 7.6 centimeters) may also be made if your surgeon needs to put their hand inside your belly to feel the intestine or remove the diseased segment.

• Your belly is filled with a harmless gas to expand it. This makes it easy for the surgeon to see and work.

• The diseased part of your small intestine is located and removed.
If you have open surgery:

• The surgeon makes a cut of 6 to 8 inches (15.2 to 20.3 centimeters) in your mid-belly.

• The diseased part of your small intestine is located and removed.
In both kinds of surgery, the next steps are:

• If there is enough healthy small intestine left, the ends are stitched or stapled together. This is called an anastomosis. Most patients have this done.

• If there is not enough healthy small intestine to reconnect, your surgeon makes an opening called a stoma through the skin of your belly. The small intestine is attached to the outer wall of your belly. Stool will go through the stoma into a drainage bag outside your body.

This is called an ileostomy. The ileostomy may be either short-term or permanent. Small bowel resection usually takes 1 to 4 hours.

LARGE BOWELL RESECTION

Description

Large bowel resection is surgery to remove all or part of your large bowel. This surgery is also called colectomy. The large bowel is also called the large intestine or colon.

• Removal of the entire colon and the rectum is called a proctocolectomy.

• Removal of all of the colon but not the rectum is called subtotal colectomy.

• Removal of part of the colon but not the rectum is called a partial colectomy.

The large bowel connects the small intestine to the anus. Normally, stool passes through the large bowel before leaving the body through the anus.

You’ll receive general anesthesia at the time of your surgery. This will keep you asleep and pain-free.

The surgery can be performed laparoscopically or with open surgery. Depending on which surgery you have, the surgeon will make one or more cuts (incisions) in your belly.

If you have laparoscopic surgery:

• The surgeon makes 3 to 5 small cuts (incisions) in your belly. A medical device called a laparoscope is inserted through one of the cuts. The scope is a thin, lighted tube with a camera on the end. It lets the surgeon see inside your belly. Other medical instruments are inserted through the other cuts.

• A cut of about 2 to 3 inches (5 to 7.6 centimeters) may also be made if your surgeon needs to put their hand inside your belly to feel or remove the diseased bowel.

• Your belly is filled with a harmless gas to expand it. This makes the area easier to see and work in.

• The surgeon examines the organs in your belly to see if there are any problems.

• The diseased part of your large bowel is located and removed. Some lymph nodes may also be removed.

If you have open surgery:

• The surgeon makes a cut of 6 to 8 inches (15.2 to 20.3 centimeters) in your lower belly.

• The organs in your belly are examined to see if there are any problems.

• The diseased part of your large bowel is located and removed. Some lymph nodes may also be removed.

In both kinds of surgery, the next steps are:

• If there is enough healthy large intestine left, the ends are stitched or stapled together. This is called an anastomosis. Most patients have this done.

• If there is not enough healthy large intestine to reconnect, the surgeon makes an opening called a stoma through the skin of your belly. The colon is attached to the outer wall of your belly. Stool will go through the stoma into a drainage bag outside your body.

This is called a colostomy. The colostomy may be either short-term or permanent.

Colectomy usually takes between 1 and 4 hours.